Tag Archives: guadalupe

Crawdad on the Guadalupe

Keep meaning to post this photo. Was drinking with some sk8er doods on the Guadalupe trail (yeah, the one where Byebye and Shlort takes place) and up comes this crawdad, who feared nothing. Fuck your teckate! His arms are raised like the part in Byebye when they go under the freeways and it … wait, no spoilers.

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Keep meaning to write up something about the skate ramps etc etc that folks have been building last couple of years, which piss off the water company. This isn’t the moment for me to do that writing, except to say that ever since they’ve been putting those little ramps and stuff up, I feel for the first time that the freeway infrastructure somehow has an essential life force to it. Anyone who’s awake knows that freeway flyovers and their necessary piers and wasted terrestrial underbellies are an abomination. Far from removing these toxic spaces from our towns, the skate gear does put a beautiful human touch to it all, and makes these spaces useful in a down-to-earth way. More on that someday. You can start by reading Folklore of the Freeway.

Stuff about biking

Just found this huge stash of notes hidden where I’d never find them: in my fartsmone’s “notes” app. I don’t remember writing them. Glad they didn’t get lost!
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Expansion in San Jose Scooter Sharing

San José-area people who really hate walking are increasingly using dockless scooter-sharing for last-mile mobility with services such as Bird and Lime. South Bay Clean Creeks volunteers really love fishing them by the dozens out of the rivers, and in Santa Monica people even use them for firewood. Here’s what this cartoonist thought of first in terms of the trend’s expansion –which has proven to be true.

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SJPD Clears Homeless Shelf Under 280/87 20 June 2018

Beginning approximately 1PM today, Wednesday 20 June 2018, cops cleared out the Shelf, a popular camping spot for homeless San José citizens.

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The Shelf is on the Guadalupe Path, beneath the 280/87 interchange, whose conception is documented in Jan McDaniel’s master’s thesis Demolition of a San José Neighborhood. The novel I’m working on takes place right here, as does much of my real free time.

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Was on my bike finally on the way to visit someone there, when the cops show up. Crews in trucks marked Tucker and Jensen came to pack up trash and whatever gets left behind. SJPD is known to impound and eventually destroy property during sweeps like these.

It is not totally illegal to sleep out in San José, which is a rare luxury in the area. However, a representative of the Santa Clara Water District confirmed by telephone today that it “owns” the entire Guadalupe River. Water companies in the city are known to frown on camping on their property, so the call to clear the Shelf could have come from them. There is also a restriction on sleeping in cars and “storing” vehicles on public curbs.

It’s a drag because the camp has held out for a solid six months, as peacefully as we can imagine without having seen it the whole time. A man I was talking to as a source for my novel was living there, though I did not see him when the sweep began , and now I’m not sure if I’ll find him again. We haven’t traded phone numbers. I would like to have shown him my appreciation better, even with just a beer or a sandwich.

New Tech-Inspired Sculpture in Guadalupe River

Here’s the Coleman Avenue bridge, by the big shopping center at Taylor, where the recent floods have provided for the latest sculpture to hit San José, this time in the middle of the river. Like many sculptures in the city, it’s a meaningless technical exercise, an immense MS Paint job executed by not even an amateur but a disinterested user. The title of the piece is “Interpolating Concepts,” grabbed mid-paragraph from the piece’s indecipherable pseudo-philosophical justification, which is attached to the river bed and visible only to divers.

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“Interpolating Concepts”

The medium is pile of sticks and tree trunks on a plinth of rocks with support from a live tree.20170225_161628

When in fifty years, when the vacuous tech-boom society of Google employees collectively decides, based on a single meme, that this is the most important art of their era, and the artist is asked about his motivation, he’ll have nothing to say but that his boss commissioned it in order to show some long-vanished investors the company’s edgy design ideas, much like the inverted 3D-printed cone on the steps of the Convention Center.

The piece unfortunately took very little logistics to produce, practically zero quarterbacking of dealmaking with Chinese suppliers, and therefore practically zero child laborers were exploited in order to produce it, unlike the iPhone. Americans get off on the idea that everything they consume, including art materials, are produced under the most egregiously, unnecessarily harmful and exploitative means, because it amplifies their sensation that “we’re lucky to live here,” even though they themselves cause the rest of wherever else to not be so lucky a location.

The sculpture, nonetheless, unfortunately doesn’t really hit the latter points in any way.

Guadalupe River in Concrete and Mud 19.2.17

Here’s some arty stuff I managed to squeeze out of my crap phone camera. Radioactive saturated groundwater escaping from a large bus stop in Chernobyl. Doesn’t really do the setting justice but the colors are cool.

Something about having all that water going under the freeway pylons seemed to give the pylons a meaning or at least aesthetic place that they’d never had before. Might as well take a picture, especially since this kind of weather won’t come again for almost 30 more years! I miss having my real camera loaded all the time, but lo, too many hobbies get expensive.

1. Looking over the emergency underground spillway, toward southeast, from the west bank near Children’s Discovery Museum. Those huge sugarcubes of rubble on the east bank are usually covered in tents and people’s stuff but they hit it a few weeks ago.

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2. As above only looking due south.20170219_104045

3. From the east bank looking north. The furthest visible pylon is what we see in the topmost image above. The blade of the underground spillway wall is illuminated at left in the very back.20170219_111628

Update: Guadalupe River 22.1.2017

Here’s some photos of the Guadalupe at Virginia St on Saturday morning, not only big and beautiful again after last night’s rain but also moving fast, as I got it at about 8 in the morning this time. It’s kind of best that it’s being unceremoniously pumped out to sea, as no one in San Jose, especially not Willow Glen, deserves this life-giving water. You’re just gonna water your organic lawns with it.

I know it’s hard not to be an innovator every second of your existence, but try not to focus on the real estate at the margins of the photos, like your liberal president would. In other news, 17 North is blocked again. Time to consider that this road was a bad idea and do something different… remember the train tunnel?? It’s gotta still be there, right?

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