Tag Archives: highway 87

Guadalupe River Near Flood Stage 14.2.19

The Guadalupe River swelled up to 7 feet, just shy of flood stage, on Thursday the 14th. There was an advisory either that night or the night before that the river would reach its flood stage of 8 feet but I don’t think the water made it that high.
Not nearly as cool as snow reaching the full length of the Santa Isabel foothills on the fifth (Karl Mondon of the BANG took some cool pictures that suggest the full extent), but unlike all yall reading this I don’t have a drone nor the unlimited free time to film that rare event, so the high river will have to do.

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The angle above, taken from the western, high-ground arm of the bike trail, should be useful for comparison on low-water days. The eastern, low-ground arm of the trail is submerged about a meter or so here. The arrogant ecocidal piers of highways 280 and 87 stand on concrete feet right in the river from here until San Fernando Street.

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Both flood channels are fully engaged as water tops their concrete curbs above and below.

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Down the way a few blocks, Willow Glen Manor still exists, for now. Yes, it’s that bad. The clearance is less than 4 meters now. The bridge I’m standing on will be gone soon too, as it’s not only leaning to the west (drive over it and bounce down that 2-inch gap) but it’s so undermined by homeless campers’ hand-dug terracing that one day the river is going to turn it like a spigot handle. But don’t listen to me, see South Bay Clean Creeks Coalition for more on that.
The warning that came over cellphones etc. warned that Willow Glen would flood, but no such luck. The term flood would have been interpreted with exaggeration in the case of that district anyhow. We’ll have to wait yet for the Old-Testament destruction of that haven of narcissism and girlfriend-experiences.
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Here’s some sewers running at overflow down over the bike path onto Willow, where it made a significant eddy just above a storm drain that goes to the river. It hadn’t rained all day, so I think this is coming up from the local storm sewers and not down from the freeway.

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BYEBYE AND SHLORT – NEW NOVEL MAY 2019 BY EUGENIO NEGRO

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San José Floats On the Backs of Salmon

In The Guadalupe River and the Hidden Heart of San José, Eric Simons writes in the latest Bay Nature magazine about my beloved and trash-choked Guadalupe River and its system in the Santa Clara Valley. The interviewee, Roger Castillo, has showed the writer around the city where salmon, whom I never see in my stretch of the Guadalupe, are living in the storm drains of the freeway system. I found this astoundingly poetic. Homeless fish living under the freeway because they can’t afford the river! Thanks, successful people!

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Photo by Andrea Laue of the storm channel along the Guadalupe Trail facing Park Avenue from San Fernando Street. I disagree with the sanitization and happy color but it’s a good picture.

The article is worth a read no matter where you live. If it smashes some preconceptions about Silicon Valley, that’s a bonus. There are a lot of us in this town who would love to see the freeways, semiconductors and banks vanish with their neonazi brogrammer operators and have our cheapass stonefruit and goats back.

Those moved to help the river can sign up to clean it with the 222 Crew of South Bay Clean Creeks Coalition, a local organization with community-based anarchy leadership. Make it a punishment for when your kids are on their phone too much!

In related news, I recently looked and found out that people living downtown such as the Washington “Goosetown” and Reed neighborhoods use groundwater, so it’s in everyone’s best interest not to trash the river.

SJPD Clears Homeless Shelf Under 280/87 20 June 2018

Beginning approximately 1PM today, Wednesday 20 June 2018, cops cleared out the Shelf, a popular camping spot for homeless San José citizens.

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The Shelf is on the Guadalupe Path, beneath the 280/87 interchange, whose conception is documented in Jan McDaniel’s master’s thesis Demolition of a San José Neighborhood. The novel I’m working on takes place right here, as does much of my real free time.

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Was on my bike finally on the way to visit someone there, when the cops show up. Crews in trucks marked Tucker and Jensen came to pack up trash and whatever gets left behind. SJPD is known to impound and eventually destroy property during sweeps like these.

It is not totally illegal to sleep out in San José, which is a rare luxury in the area. However, a representative of the Santa Clara Water District confirmed by telephone today that it “owns” the entire Guadalupe River. Water companies in the city are known to frown on camping on their property, so the call to clear the Shelf could have come from them. There is also a restriction on sleeping in cars and “storing” vehicles on public curbs.

It’s a drag because the camp has held out for a solid six months, as peacefully as we can imagine without having seen it the whole time. A man I was talking to as a source for my novel was living there, though I did not see him when the sweep began , and now I’m not sure if I’ll find him again. We haven’t traded phone numbers. I would like to have shown him my appreciation better, even with just a beer or a sandwich.

Guadalupe River in Concrete and Mud 19.2.17

Here’s some arty stuff I managed to squeeze out of my crap phone camera. Radioactive saturated groundwater escaping from a large bus stop in Chernobyl. Doesn’t really do the setting justice but the colors are cool.

Something about having all that water going under the freeway pylons seemed to give the pylons a meaning or at least aesthetic place that they’d never had before. Might as well take a picture, especially since this kind of weather won’t come again for almost 30 more years! I miss having my real camera loaded all the time, but lo, too many hobbies get expensive.

1. Looking over the emergency underground spillway, toward southeast, from the west bank near Children’s Discovery Museum. Those huge sugarcubes of rubble on the east bank are usually covered in tents and people’s stuff but they hit it a few weeks ago.

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2. As above only looking due south.20170219_104045

3. From the east bank looking north. The furthest visible pylon is what we see in the topmost image above. The blade of the underground spillway wall is illuminated at left in the very back.20170219_111628

Tweeker Surveillance on Guadalupe Trail?

What is this thing and what’s it doing?

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Was scurrying about on the Guadalupe Trail when I spied this thing spying on the Virginia lightrail overpass. It’s stuck up in a eucalyptus, as you can see, and appears to be a motion-activated camera or something. Search terms on the internet aren’t turning up anything specific to the city, though I’m led to believe that it intends to cotch vandals.

I’d simply love to interview the city employee who had to paint it eucalyptus camouflage. Anyone who knows should comment below!

For me it has a guttural shouty voice like, “Rrrrrrrri’m spottin in the buuuuurrshhhh!!” The padlock tells me that it’s either got a wireless telephone up under it or a stash of corn nuts.