Tag Archives: technology

David Mejia’s Before and After Thanksgiving

Finally, finally made it to the fourth floor of my beloved King Library, after a bitter monthlong absence, to be shit last in seeing San José old hand David Mejia’s exhibition Before and After Thanksgiving. It’s a painting (watercolor, right?) exercise and a modest history lesson. Mejia has been pushing his stuff for years. One of my favorites is the profane and puerile Ballman. It’s excellent that he’s getting some love at the library. Go see the paintings before November 30! I’ll let the paintings speak for themselves:

 

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Low-res, off-center photos posted for collegiality and appreciation only. I really dig the playful but purposeful use of color and the comic book-style planning in general. It gives an emotional directness needed by the subject, just as an improvised shamanic performance would in a more advanced culture than our own.

I also like how he mentioned using fish as fertilizer in poor soils, because it reminded me of the many years of my life I spent wondering why the fuck, as it said in some school textbook of mine, they “planted fish.”

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Housing Crisis Plan: Cheap Fentanyl for All Homeowners

Happy Halloween everyone! Not scared yet? Think of how you’re going to pay rent this month! Just consider, if we could just convince property owners to lower their arbitrary prices. What good is private property when it can’t get be traded easily for a fix?

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Jon Taplin on the Libertarian Internet

Here’s an excellent talk by Jon Taplin of the Annenberg School of Communication at USC and father of Post-Consumer‘s Nick Taplin, on the problems of libertarian dumbshits who control the internet and also US politics. Remember kids, libertarians and neonazis are the SAME PEOPLE, Google CEO or not.

As a fairly true anarchist artist who is always about community, dialogue and exposure before “copyright,” I nevertheless appreciate Taplin’s warning that “the technological revolution is coming for all of your jobs.” Does that make me double down on copyright? Fuck no! It makes me double down on 1.) reduction of reliance on capitalism’s rules for survival and 2.) increase of sharing all things so that they don’t end up falling apart when whatever thing comes for whatever of all our things. Enjoy the video!

Breeding Ourselves To Extinction

From Dady Chery, News Junkie Post, via Extinction Chronicles. Worth the two minutes it takes to read it, pendejos!

The Extinction Chronicles

http://www.counterpunch.org/2014/11/19/breeding-ourselves-to-extinction/

The United Nations has held countless major meetings on climate change, at great consumption of fuel, that have amounted to nothing but reports and promises of more talk. After many of these alarming reports, the G20 leaders, in November 2014, decided to throw several billions of dollars at the problem. Despite climate-change denial becoming incorrect, as long as a discussion of overpopulation, in the context of climate-change mitigation, remains a taboo, we may be sure that nothing will be achieved. If we are serious about reducing our carbon footprint, we must rethink the flawed capitalist concept of unending economic growth and consider reducing the number of human feet in the world. Overpopulation must be discussed in the context of climate change. A major impediment to this discussion has been the assumption that Africa and Asia would be the main targets for depopulation, with…

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Cañada del Oro Wildflowers, Geocache Quached

Finally got up to Cañada del Oro, my favorite favorite place to bum around, last Saturday, to see the wildflowers. Though this is the most reliable place I know of in the San Ho area to see an astounding variety of wildflowers, I was somewhat nervous to see Indian Paintbrushes before the heat gets them. Saw this cool turkey on the way in, but I had to shoot the photo into the sun…

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Shitty digital Canon Elph lens was NOT cooperating to catch these blue dicks! You can eat them… IMG_2435

Shooting stars in the daytime!

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Finally the Indian Paintbrush showed up. I’m pretty sure the one below with the serrated leaves is also a kind of paintbrush, but someone can comment and fill me in.

IMG_2439IMG_2438Finally, I nabbed a bit of geocached plastic pollution! It’s been signed and stamped and commented upon by such as Mia Quiche, Fleetwood 7 and others. I took that shit back to the city and recycled it. Fuck your plastic geo-trash, Fleetwood 7!

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New Tech-Inspired Sculpture in Guadalupe River

Here’s the Coleman Avenue bridge, by the big shopping center at Taylor, where the recent floods have provided for the latest sculpture to hit San José, this time in the middle of the river. Like many sculptures in the city, it’s a meaningless technical exercise, an immense MS Paint job executed by not even an amateur but a disinterested user. The title of the piece is “Interpolating Concepts,” grabbed mid-paragraph from the piece’s indecipherable pseudo-philosophical justification, which is attached to the river bed and visible only to divers.

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“Interpolating Concepts”

The medium is pile of sticks and tree trunks on a plinth of rocks with support from a live tree.20170225_161628

When in fifty years, when the vacuous tech-boom society of Google employees collectively decides, based on a single meme, that this is the most important art of their era, and the artist is asked about his motivation, he’ll have nothing to say but that his boss commissioned it in order to show some long-vanished investors the company’s edgy design ideas, much like the inverted 3D-printed cone on the steps of the Convention Center.

The piece unfortunately took very little logistics to produce, practically zero quarterbacking of dealmaking with Chinese suppliers, and therefore practically zero child laborers were exploited in order to produce it, unlike the iPhone. Americans get off on the idea that everything they consume, including art materials, are produced under the most egregiously, unnecessarily harmful and exploitative means, because it amplifies their sensation that “we’re lucky to live here,” even though they themselves cause the rest of wherever else to not be so lucky a location.

The sculpture, nonetheless, unfortunately doesn’t really hit the latter points in any way.